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Car thief caught on tape!! with Train Horn Alarm System

Posted by autotran on May 7, 2009

Here’s a security video of some crazy car thief trying to break into my ride right in front of my shop!!

He got what was coming to him though

97 Land Cruiser
Factory RS3000 Alarm System
Nathan Airchime K3HA
ViAir 450c compressor
Twin 5G/7P tanks

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Smart Fortwo ‘Security & Sound Systems’ on KITV Morning News

Posted by autotran on May 7, 2009

This 2009 Smart Fortwo is equipped with an Apple Mac mini, Alpine PDX amplifiers, Focal speakers, a Digital Designs subwoofer, and Dynamat to maximize audio performance. It features a complete custom paint job by Aiea Colliosion Center and performance suspension by Pacific Automotive.

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Trucks, Buses, Mpvs: Federal Lighting Equipment Location Requirements

Posted by autotran on May 5, 2009

Basic Equipment Required On All Trucks, Buses & Mpvs

IMPORTANT NOTE: Every lamp, reflex reflector, and conspicuity treatment (device) must be permanently attached in the location specified below and must comply with all applicable requirements prescribed for it by FMVSS/CMVSS 108. The face of any device on the front/rear and sides should be, respectively perpendicular and parallel to vehicle centerline, unless it is photometrically certified at installation angle. No part of the vehicle shall prevent any device from meeting its prescribed requirements unless an auxiliary device meeting all prescribed requirements is installed.

In Canada: Manufacturers and importers of vehicles must have the proper certification test records demonstrating compliance of lighting components with all prescribed requirements.

Basic Equipment Required On All Trucks, Buses & Mpvs

>(H, HR)
Attention: US: "DOT" lettering required on lens
Attention: US & Canada: light source code required on lens

DESCRIPTION MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS
Area Equipment (SAE Lens Coding) Functional
Purpose
Quantity Color Location Height mm (in.)
from the ground
1 Headlamps – Lower Beam (H, HR)
Attention: US: "DOT" lettering required on lens
Attention: US & Canada: light source code required on lens
Forward road illumination Minimum 2 White On the front – symmetrical – as far apart as practicable
(If 4 lamp system – outboard or above upper beams)
560-1370 (22-54)
Forward road illumination Minimum 2 White On the front – symmetrical
( If 4 lamp system – inboard or below lower beams )
560-1370 (22-54)
Parking Lamps-Attention: Required only on vehicles less than 2032mm wide (P) Indicate parked vehicle Minimum 2 White or Yellow Front – symmetrical – as far apart as practicable 380-1530 (15-60)
Daytime Running Lamps
Attention: for Canada required, for US optional.
(Y2)
Attention: for US, "DRL" lettering required on lens if device is not headlamp
Indicate in-use vehicle Minimum 2 White or Yellow Front – symmetrical – as far apart as practicable 380 (15) minimum Maximum depends on type of DRL
Front Turn Signal/Hazard Warning Lamps ( l) Indicate direction of turn / identify disabled vehicle Minimum 2 Yellow Front – symmetrical – as far apart as practicable 380-2110 (15-83)
2 Front Clearance Lamps
Attention: Required for vehicles 2032mm wide or wider
( P2, PC* or P3*,PC2)
*photometrically certified at installation angle
Show vehicle’s width Minimum 2 Yellow At widest point – symmetrical – on the front or near the front – facing forward As high as practicable
3 Front Identification Lamps (ID) (P2 or P3) Indicate presence of a wide vehicle Exactly 3 Yellow on the front – center – horizontally spaced 150 mm (6 in.) to 300 mm (12 in.) apart As high as practicable or on top of cab
4a Front Side Marker Lamps ( P2, PC* or P3 ,PC2*)
*photometrically certified at installation angle
  Minimum 2 Yellow Each side at front – as far forward as practicable 380 (15) minimum
4b Front Side Reflex Reflectors (A) Front and Rear side marker lamps / side Minimum 2 Yellow At front – symmetrical – as far forward as practicable – facing sideward 380-1530 (15-60)
5a Rear Side Marker Lamps ** (P2, PC* or P3, PC2*)
*photometrically certified at installation angle
reflex reflector indicate vehicle’s presence and length Minimum 2 Red Each side at rear – as far back as practicable 380 (15) minimum
5b Rear Side Reflex
Reflectors
**
** not required on Truck Tractors
(A)   Minimum 2 Red Each side at rear – as far back as practicable – facing sideward 380-1530 (15-60)
6 Rear Clearance Lamps
Attention:
Required for vehicles 2032mm wide or wider, but not required on Truck Tractors
(P2, PC* or P3, PC2*)
*photometrically certified at installation angle
Show vehicle’s width –
MAY NOT be combined with tail lamps
Minimum 2 Red At widest point – symmetrical – on the rear or near the rear – facing rearward As high as practicable-may be lower only if rear ID lamps are at the top
7 Rear Identification Lamps
(ID)
Attention:
Required for vehicles 2032mm wide or wider, but not required on Truck Tractors
(P2 or P3 ) Indicate presence of a wide vehicle Exactly 3 Red Rear – center – horizontally spaced 150 mm (6 in.) to 300 mm (12 in.) apart, facing rearward in Canada : at the top – maybe lower if door header narrower than 25mm
in USA: as high as practicable
8 Tail Lamps (T) Indicate vehicle’s presence and width Minimum 2 Red On the rear – symmetrical – as far apart as practicable 380-1830 (15-72)
Stop Lamps (S) Indicate braking Minimum 2 Red On the rear – symmetrical – as far apart as practicable 380-1830 (15-72)
Rear Turn Signal/Hazard Warning Lamps ( I) Indicate direction of turn/ identifies disabled veh. Minimum 2 Red or Yellow On the rear – symmetrical – as far apart as practicable 380-2110 (15-83)
Rear Reflex Reflectors (A) Show vehicle’s presence and width Minimum 2 Red On the rear – symmetrical – as far apart as practicable – facing rearward 380-1530 (15-60)
9 Backup Lamp (R) Illuminate ground behind the vehicle and alert road users Minimum 1 White Rear No requirement
10 License Plate Lamp(s) (L) Illuminates license plate Minimum 1 White On the rear – above or at the sides of license plate No requirement
11 Center High Mounted Stop Lamp
Attention:
Required for vehicles less than 2032mm wide and 4536kg
(U3) Indicates braking Minimum 1 Red On the rear – centerline of the vehicle 860 (34) minimum

ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT FOR SPECIFIC VEHICLES

VEHICLES 9.1 m (30 ft.) LONG OR LONGER

DESCRIPTION MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS
Area Equipment (SAE Lens Coding) Functional
Purpose
Quantity Color Location Height mm (in.)
from the ground
12a Intermediate Side Marker Lamps (P2 or PC) Indicate presence of a long vehicle Minimum 2 Yellow Each side near center 380 (15) minimum
12b Intermediate Side Reflex Reflectors (A) Indicate presence of a long vehicle Minimum 2 Yellow Each side near center – facing sideward 380-1530 (15-60)

TRUCK TRACTORS

DESCRIPTION MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS  
Area Conspicuity Treatment DOT Code Quantity Color Location Height Options
13 Rear Upper Body Marking DOT-C, DOT-C2, DOT-C3, or DOT-C4 Exactly 2 pairs of 300mm long strips White Rear upper corners of cab – facing rearward As high as practicable excluding fairings  
14 Rear Marking DOT-C, DOT-C2, DOT-C3, or DOT-C4 Exactly 2 sections of min. 600mm each Red/White Rear – facing rearward – on fenders, on mud flaps brackets, or within 300mm below of the top of mud flaps As horizontal as practicable and not higher than 1525 mm from the ground If mud flaps not used – on the cab or frame mounted brackets

This table summarizes lighting equipment requirements contained in Federal/Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108. For complete compliance requirements consult Title 49 – Code of Federal Regulations, Section 571.108. (USA) and Section 108 of the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations (Canada).

State or Provincial regulations, where they may apply, have not been included.

For more information contact:

Transport Canada: Motor Vehicle Safety Enforcement Branch
Attention: Marcin Gorzkowski
Fax: (613) 998-4831

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
Office of Safety Performance Standards
Attention: Rich VanIderstine
Fax: (202) 366-4329

TRUCKS, BUSES, MPVs: FEDERAL LIGHTING EQUIPMENT LOCATION REQUIREMENTS

TRUCKS, BUSES, MPVs: FEDERAL LIGHTING EQUIPMENT LOCATION REQUIREMENTS


source: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/portal/site/nhtsa/template.MAXIMIZE/menuitem.a17d2848031e27a1ba7d9d1046108a0c/?javax.portlet.tpst=4427b997caacf504a8bdba101891ef9a_ws_MX&javax.portlet.prp_4427b997caacf504a8bdba101891ef9a_viewID=detail_view&itemID=48129134db1bff00VgnVCM1000002c567798RCRD&viewType=standard

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Antilock Brake Systems (ABS)

Posted by autotran on May 5, 2009

Protect yourself and your family whenever you’re on the road. When used properly, an antilock brake system (ABS) adds an important measure of safety to your driving, under all conditions. ABS lets you maintain vehicle stability and directional control, and may reduce stopping distances during hard braking – particularly on wet and icy roads. But to work properly, you have to allow your ABS to do its job. So it’s important to understand how ABS works.

Wheel lockup: slippery when wet.

When your wheels lock up on wet and slippery roads or during a panic stop, you may lose traction and control, causing your vehicle to spin. Antilock brakes keep your wheels from locking up, so your car maintains directional control around hazards if you can’t make a complete stop in time.

The pumping heart of an antilock brake system.

ABS works with your regular braking system by automatically pumping them. In vehicles not equipped with ABS, the driver has to manually pump the brakes to prevent wheel lockup. In vehicles equipped with ABS, your foot should remain firmly planted on the brake pedal, while ABS pumps the brakes for you so you can concentrate on steering to safety.

More specifically, ABS automatically changes the brake fluid pressure at each wheel to maintain optimum brake performance just short of locking up the wheels. There is an electronic control unit that regulates the brake fluid pressure in response to changing road conditions or impending wheel lockup.

How to know if your vehicle is equipped with ABS.

Most newer vehicles offer ABS as either standard or optional equipment. To find out whether your car has an antilock brake system, and what type, read your owner’s manual. You can also check your instrument panel for a yellow ABS indicator light after you turn on the ignition. And when you buy, lease or rent a vehicle, always ask if it comes equipped with ABS.

There’s more than one kind of antilock brake system.
Four-wheel systems, including those found on cars and minivans, are designed to keep all four wheels from locking up. Rear-wheel-only systems, found on some pickups, vans and sport-utility vehicles, keep the vehicle from spinning out of control, but the front wheels may lock up, resulting in a loss of steering control.

The feel and sound of ABS.
When ABS is activated, you may experience a slight vibration or a rapid pulsation of the brake pedal’ almost as if the brakes are pushing back at you. At times, you will feel the pedal suddenly drop. The valves in the ABS unit may make a grinding, scraping or buzzing noise. This means your ABS is working. Continue to apply firm pressure and steer. Do not take your foot off the brake pedal.

Do cars with ABS stop more quickly than cars without?
Perhaps, but that’s not the main purpose of ABS. It is a system designed to help you maintain control of the vehicle during emergency braking situations, not necessarily make the car stop more quickly. ABS may shorten stopping distances on wet or slippery roads and most systems may shorten stopping distances on dry roads. On very soft surfaces, such as gravel or unpacked snow, ABS may actually lengthen stopping distances. In wet or icy conditions, you should still make sure you drive carefully, always keep a safe distance behind the vehicle in front of you, and maintain a speed consistent with the road conditions.

Stop and get to know your ABS.
After you consult your owner’s manual for more details, give your ABS a mini-road test. In an unobstructed parking lot, drive your vehicle at a speed above which the antilock brake system activates (usually above 10 mph) and apply the brakes firmly. The antilock brake system is speed-sensitive and will not activate at very slow speeds. Also, it’s easier to activate ABS on a wet and slippery surface. The antilock system should prevent the wheels from skidding. Practice NOT pumping the brake.

Other considerations for better braking.
How effectively you can stop your vehicle can be influenced by many factors including:

  • Road conditions, since wet and slippery roads provide less tire friction and will therefore result in longer stopping distances than dry roads.
  • Vehicle condition, including properly inflated tires that have good tread, and a properly maintained brake system that is free from defects such as worn linings, air or dirt in the brake fluid, or leaks that reduce the available braking force.
  • Driver reaction time. At 60 mph, your car travels 88 feet each second. Reaction time, that is the time it takes a driver to identify a braking situation and then apply the brakes, will affect the overall distance to stop. A one-half second reaction time will result in a vehicle stopping 88 feet shorter from 60 mph than a one-and-one-half second reaction time. That is why it is important to always pay attention to the road and other traffic.
  • Type of brake system. When faced with a panic braking situation, ABS allows a driver to rapidly apply the brakes without worrying about wheel lockup, and the vehicle begins to stop immediately. Without ABS, a rapid, hard brake application could cause wheel lockup and loss of vehicle steering control, if the driver does not pump the brakes correctly or limit the brake pedal force to prevent wheel lockup. Therefore, more driver skill is needed to obtain short stops without ABS.

Be the safest driver you can be. Call or log on for more information.
Call the NHTSA Auto Safety Hotline at 1-888-DASH-2-DOT (327-4236), TDD 1-800-424-9153 or find more information on NHTSA’s web site at www.nhtsa.dot.gov.

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Vehicle Identification Numbers (VINs)

Posted by autotran on May 4, 2009

Since 1954, American automobile manufacturers have used a vehicle identification number (V.I.N.) to describe and identify motor vehicles. The early VINs came in a wide array of configurations and variations, depending on the individual manufacturer.

Beginning with model year (MY)1981, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration required that all over-the-road-vehicles sold must contain a 17-character VIN. This standard established a fixed VIN format.

THE VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER AND THE FEDERAL

PARTS-MARKING PROGRAM

The Department of Transportation issued the Federal Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Standard to reduce the number of motor vehicle thefts by assisting law enforcement authorities in tracing and recovering parts from stolen motor vehicles. This standard became effective beginning with model year (MY)1987 and required that designated high-theft car lines 12 or14 (two-door/four door models) of its major component parts be marked with the vehicle identification number (VIN). This standard, which at that time only applied to passenger cars, specifically required manufacturers to apply the VIN onto certain covered original equipment major parts and replacement parts for those vehicles that had been designated as likely high-theft car lines, unless the line was exempted from the marking requirements because it was equipped with an antitheft device as standard equipment on the entire line.

In 1994, the Theft Prevention Standard was amended by extending the parts-marking requirements originally specific to passenger cars, to include multipurpose passenger vehicles (MPVs) and light-duty trucks (rated at 6,000 pounds gross vehicle weight or less). This rule also listed the covered major component parts and replacement parts to be marked for each of the classes of vehicles (the engine, transmission, front/rear bumper, right/left front fender, hood, right/left front door, right/left rear door, sliding cargo door(s), right/left quarter panel (passenger cars), right/left side assembly (MPVs), pickup box, and /or cargo box (light-duty trucks), rear doors, decklid or hatchback and tailgate); and established a new median theft rate of 3.5826 for all passenger motor vehicles. The agency also required that certain selected lines with below median theft rates be parts marked.

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U.S. DOT Orders Full Review of Motorcoach Safety

Posted by autotran on May 2, 2009

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood today ordered a full departmental review of motorcoach safety. A Departmental Motorcoach Safety Action Plan will be created from the review’s findings. The plan will outline the additional steps needed to improve motorcoach safety for the millions of Americans who rely on these vehicles for safe transportation.

“Motorcoaches have been a safe form of transportation in the United States for many years, but even a single crash or accident is unacceptable” said Secretary LaHood. “We will continue our efforts to make them as safe as possible. As Secretary of Transportation, safety is my top priority.”

U.S. DOT agencies participating in the creation of the Action Plan include the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, the Federal Highway Administration and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. The review will also consider outstanding recommendations to U.S. DOT from the National Transportation Safety Board.

The full departmental review follows a recent NTSB hearing concerning the motorcoach crash in Utah in January 2008 that resulted in nine fatalities. The report is expected to be completed and released by August 2009.

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Safe & Secure: Choosing the right car seat for your child

Posted by autotran on April 29, 2009

Infants

Newborn babies and infants require special protection while in a vehicle. In a collision, properly installed rear-facing car seats can save your child’s life.

Birth to 9 kg (20 lb.)

Birth to 9 kg (20 lb.)

Infant car seats should face the back of the vehicle, rest on a 45-degree angle and move no more than 2.5 cm (1 in.) side-to-side or forward at the base. If necessary, use a towel or a foam bar (pool noodle) under the base of the child car seat to adjust the angle. Harness straps should be slotted at or below a baby’s shoulders. You should not be able to fit more than one finger underneath the harness straps at the child’s collarbone. The chest clip should be flat against the chest at armpit level.

When the child outgrows the maximum height and weight of his/her infant seat, you may require a convertible rear-facing seat until your child is ready to be facing forward. The law requires using a rear-facing car seat until the baby is at least 9 kilograms (20 lb.) The law is a minimum requirement.

The law is a minimum requirement. It’s best to keep your child rear-facing until they are at least one year old or until they have reached either the maximum height or weight limits of the rear-facing seat.

  • Birth to 9 kg (20 lb.)
  • Rear-facing seat
  • Use away from an active airbag

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Toddlers

By law a child can ride facing forward when they are over 9 kg (20 lb.) or more.

All forward-facing car seats must use a tether strap. If your vehicle does not have a tether anchor in place, contact a dealership to have one installed.

To prevent the car seat from moving forward and causing injury in a collision, it is important to use the tether strap exactly as the manufacturer recommends.

To install a forward-facing car seat, fasten the tether strap, then use your body weight to tighten and fasten the seatbelt or Universal Anchorage System (UAS).

Ensure that the shoulder straps are at or above the child’s shoulders. Straps should be snug, with only one finger width between the strap and the child’s chest. Avoid using aftermarket car seat products. They can become projectiles or may have hard or sharp surfaces that can hurt the child in a collision.

  • 9 to 18 kg (20-40 lb.)
  • Forward-facing seat
  • Use with a tether strap

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Pre-school to 8 years old

child weighs 36 kg (80 lbs.)

child weighs 36 kg (80 lbs.)

The law requires booster seats for children who have outgrown a child car seat but are too small for a regular seat belt.

Booster seats are required for children under the age of eight, weighing 18 kg or more but less than 36 kg (40-80 lbs) and who stand less than 145 cm (4 feet 9 inches) tall.

A child can start using a seatbelt alone once any one of the following criteria is met:

  • child turns eight years old
  • child weighs 36 kg (80 lbs.)
  • child is 145 cm (4 feet 9 inches) tall.

A lap and shoulder combination belt must be used with all booster seats. Your child’s head must be supported by the top of the booster, vehicle seat or headrest. The shoulder strap must lie across the child’s shoulder (not the neck or face) and middle of the chest, and the lap belt must cross low over the hips (not the stomach/abdomen). Never use seatbelt adjusters.

  • Between 18 and 36 kg (40—80 lb.)
  • Booster seat
  • Use with lap and shoulder belt

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Youth

Seatbelts are designed for adults and older, larger children. Once your child can sit all the way against the vehicle seat back with legs bent comfortably over the edge of the seat, and with the shoulder belt flat across the shoulder and chest, he or she is ready to move from the booster seat to the vehicle seatbelt.

Over 36 kg (80 lb.), 145 cm (4' 9”) tall or 8 years old

Over 36 kg (80 lb.), 145 cm (4' 9”) tall or 8 years old

Make sure the shoulder strap lies across the child’s shoulder and the middle of the chest (not the neck or face), and the lap belt crosses over the hips (not the stomach).

Children under 13 years of age are safest in the back seat. Never put two children in the same seatbelt or place the shoulder strap behind the child’s back.

Remember, one person, one belt. There must be a seatbelt for each person in the vehicle.

Use a seatbelt for every trip and teach your child to wear a seatbelt by always wearing one yourself!

  • Over 36 kg (80 lb.), 145 cm (4′ 9”) tall or 8 years old
  • Vehicle seatbelt or booster seat

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Important tips to keep your child safe and secure…

  • Use the right seat for the child’s weight and development.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for correct child car seat installation and use.
  • Be sure to secure the child correctly. Make sure harness straps are snug and tight. Use a tether strap with a forward-facing child car seat. Keep children away from all active air bags. Children under 13 years of age are safest in the back seat.
  • Use caution when buying or using a pre-owned child car seat. Buy new, or from someone you know, and check it carefully. Make sure the car seat has:
    • instructions and all necessary hardware
    • not been in a collision
    • a Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (CMVSS) sticker
    • not expired or is not older than 10 years
    • no discoloured (stress) marks or cracks and the harness is not worn or torn.

Top of page

How Do I Know the Seat is Installed Correctly?

Carefully follow the owner’s manuals for both your vehicle and the child car seat. Click here for step-by-step Tips for Installing Child Car Seats with photos.

Most importantly, ensure the seat is tightly secured. If you are having difficulty or want to have your child car seat installation inspected, contact your local public health unit.

To find a public health unit, check the blue pages of your phone book, call the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care information line at 1-800-268-1154, or visit the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care: http://www.health.gov.on.ca – Public Health Units.

For more information about child car seat safety contact:

Ministry of transportation – MTOINFO – 1 800 268-4686

Web: www.mto.gov.on.ca

Your local public health unit

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